Good cause, Immediate cause, Insufficient cause, Intervening cause, Proximate cause

Good cause. A substantial or legally sufficient reason for a choice made or action taken or for seeking a particular court order. What constitutes good cause usually rests upon the circumstances of a particular situation.

Immediate cause. The last of a series of causes, although not necessarily the proximate cause, of an effect or result.

Insufficient cause. An insubstantial or legally insufficient reason for a choice made or action taken or for seeking a particular court order.

Intervening cause. A contributing cause that arises or occurs after the initial action, event, or force and alters the sequence of later actions, events, or forces to produce a final effect or result. For example, if a person walks into a ditch, the digging of the ditch is the initial (that is, but-for) action, and the subsequent removal of the barricade and warning signs that kept people away is the intervening cause.

Proximate cause. A cause that directly, without the contribution of any subsequent action, event, or force, produces an effect or result, and without which the effect or result would not have occurred. Furthermore, the effect or result produced by the proximate cause would have occurred even if there were a subsequent action, event, or force that contributed to the eventual effect or result. For example, if a person is fatally injured in an accident, the cause of the accident is the proximate cause of his death and not the poor medical care they received after the accident. Also called causa proxima, direct cause, efficient cause, and legal cause.

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